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Monday, March 13, 2006

I can be difficult to stop

Workplace has, as mentioned previously, locked down about 99% of the mainstream gaming sites and several blogs. Apparently enough people were playing World of Warcraft on the company network to warrant this ... a fact I find a little hard to believe since I don't think anyone has been fired for doing such a thing. And if people were playing these things and not getting fired ... well, hell, I want in on that action.

And yet, it hasn't really stopped me much from reading about gaming news. They can't stop certain RSS aggregators and making random technorati hunts catches up on the rest. Thanks to the "deep" web, I don't need to actually go to Kotaku or IGN to catch up on what they're saying. Fortunately Cathode Tan hasn't grown to a size to be on the radar ... that would kinda suck.

However, I do think it's outright dumb to go through all this trouble to block gaming news, but keep sites like Sports Illustrated out in the open. My brief stint on the server side of things many moons ago taught me that ESPN and SI are enormous bandwidth killers because they're a) hugely popular and b) have high image usage. But I guess we can't trample all over the company betting pool, or something.

There's no real point to this. I'm just venting.

2 comments:

Michael Birk said...

LOL. Nor can they stop you from using a web proxy, a simple thing.

Of course, Management can always say to you, "Don't go to gaming sites while at work." Then you would have to be pretty *ahem* stupid to do it anyway.

NOW GET BACK TO WORK !!!

Josh said...

Humorously, it's even easier. Because their proxy managed to break various things that I like actually need for my job ... I recently got the OK to just turn off their proxy when I "need". Still, the annoyance is high and I don't want the traffic cops to get all annoyed.

Another proxy might do the trick completely though.

I've also considered setting up the Mini at home as a VNC, even before this.