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Thursday, March 30, 2006

Lost: When Is A Wall Not A Wall?


When it's a mural? Follow the image to the left to see a nicely cleaned version of our blacklight painting from last night's episode. By most guesses, it's a map of the island facilities drawn around the time of the "incident", which looks like it was pretty messy. Not that that's terribly surprising. The "I AM HERE" is interesting, especially compared to the "I AM SICK" which has been seen on the hatch's previous mural. Apparently on of the hatch's previous attendees had a lot of free time.

Last night completely illustrates what's still fun about Lost. I don't think the show will ever be as good as the first two or three episodes of Season One, but last night kept us fed with character interaction and plenty of mystery. Trying to guess Gale's alignment up until the end of the episode was great. When he slipped off the shelves and knocked himself out, I was pretty convinced I might have read Gale wrong. The Others have shown a decent amount of physical prowess in the past. Also, he honestly seemed to be in the dark about the machine ... but that could have been a ruse to see how much the survivors know about the hatch.

Still, whoever Gale camps with ... they don't want the counter to zero either it would seem. Gale was completely responsible for pushing the button. My guess is that Gale was going to infiltrate the camp and find out how much they knew and try to insure that the button was getting pushed.

But that still an odd order of business for a group which has insisted they could take the survivors whenever they wanted. Why do the Others, if they are such a force, resort to such guerrilla tactics?

Heheh. Just overheard a Lost convo across a couple of cubicles.

Anyway, great episode. Gale has been an excellent villain and it will be a shame to watch Sayid fillet him over hot coals.

Update: Duh, I could forget to mention the supply drop? Clearly DHARMA is more than just island at this point.



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6 comments:

jvm said...

Who says Gale pushed the button? I think it should be treated as wholly unknown what Gale did while out of sight. We do not know that there wasn't someone else in the hatch before, during, or after the blast door incident.

Sure, the writers want us to be paranoid. No reason not to indulge it, given the twist with Gale's identity.

Josh said...

Too true. We didn't even get a perspective of the computer or the counter, so even if Gale was the only one in the countdown room, we don't know what he did.

He could have been IMing his Other buddies, knowing full well that when the counter hit 0 it would just reset and nothing at all would happen.

Mindgames! AH!

Josh said...

Another annotated blast door:

http://www.forums.thehatchonline.com/index.php?act=ST&f=94&t=425&st=0#entry2059

Michael Birk said...

Whoo hoo! That episode more than made up for last week's dud. Deciphering the map will keep the hard-cores occupied for a while. I haven't had a chance to check it out yet.

Josh:
"Trying to guess Gale's alignment up until the end of the episode was great. When he slipped off the shelves and knocked himself out, I was pretty convinced I might have read Gale wrong."

I was thinking Gale might be on "the good side" up until he memorized the numbers in one shot.

Any thoughts on what triggered this event in the first place? The static coming from the speaker implies some technical malfunction, but, as Locke put it, "do you think it was all just random"? (or something to that effect)

Josh:
"Gale has been an excellent villain and it will be a shame to watch Sayid fillet him over hot coals."

Except that Locke promised to protect him "no matter what." Locke may keep his promise since, much to his relief (and unlike his father and his true love, Helen), Gale "came back" when he needed him.

Perhaps we will continue to see Gale used as a pawn in the power struggle between Locke and Jack.

I'm still trying to figure out what the deal is with Locke, though. He may be working with The Others, possibly unknowingly.

Josh said...

I was thinking Gale might be on "the good side" up until he memorized the numbers in one shot.

I thought that suspect as well, but I couldn't tell if it was convenient writing or a clue. If it's a clue, it might lean more to the theory that Gale is just trying to figure out what they know and is hiding what he knows.

Any thoughts on what triggered this event in the first place?

I'd like to think it's not random. Oddly, I haven't seen much discussion on that on the forums, but it would be interesting to detail what happened before Locke heard the static and see if anything might have triggered it.

It could have been as simple as a test, or maybe Gale triggered it. If he's "infected" maybe the hatch caught on? Seems a little bit of a delayed reaction, of course.

Except that Locke promised to protect him "no matter what."

Yeah, and as you say they will likely use that to wedge Locke and Jack more. But part of me would like to think that because Gale lied to Locke to get him to promise, Locke would tell him to stuff it.

But you're probably right - the father flashback indicates Locke worries more about his own integrity than others.

Michael Birk said...

Oh yeah, another great line was Jack's: "When I want the guns, I'll get the guns." Priceless! He is a bad mo-fo. Special ops, maybe?

Josh:
"I thought [Gale's quick memorization of the numbers] suspect as well, but I couldn't tell if it was convenient writing or a clue."

If it's "convenient writing," then it's bad writing, because I'm guessing 90% of the people watching had the same thought.

I would agree that ostensible clues noticed by only the most die-hard fans (such as the changes in Marvin Candle's appearance in the two films clips) are probably just meaningless "continuity errors." It is a mainstream program, after all.

The map, though -- that is just begging for off-line analysis, so who knows.

"If it's a clue, it might lean more to the theory that Gale is just trying to figure out what they know and is hiding what he knows."

Yep, and it lends more credence to the idea (already pretty much solidified) that Rousseau ("he's one of them") has been telling the truth. I think that she's batty, but honest.

"the father flashback indicates Locke worries more about his own integrity than others."

Well put. I'm sure his single biggest regret in life is lying directly to Helen's face.

BTW, did you notice that Locke felt the pain in his leg, unlike when he was with Boone? Also, we still don't know how Locke became paralyzed, correct? He's an enigma!